PhD Colloquium: Gender Challenges to Climate Change Adaption and Food Security: Evidence from Nepal

The Department of Development and Sustainability (DDS) organized a Ph.D. colloquium for Ph.D. students on 24 June 2020 as a monthly regular event of the Department. Before the presentation started, Mrs. Wachira Petcho, a Ph.D. candidate as a moderator shared that DDS had already conducted 21 sessions of Ph.D. Colloquium so far since it was started august 2017 as monthly basis. The main objectives of the colloquium to interact with the Ph.D. students under DDS to share their research, findings, experience, challenges, solutions.

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[video] What is gender and development studies?

What is gender and development studies? Japanese professors at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) tell you!

Gender Studies video made by GDS Students (Chinese subtitle available)
Speaker: Professor Kyoko Kusakabe, Gender and Development Studies (GDS) of the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT)

Recording, editing, subtitles, etc by GDS Students

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Seminar: Why Does AI Have a Gender Problem?

All are welcome to attend

Department of Development and Sustainability has a special seminar on ‘Why does AI have a gender problem?’ by Prof.Pascale Fung, Faculty of Department of Electronic & Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science & Engineering Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) as detail below:

Date: 20 August 2019
Time:  14:30 – 15:30
Venue: S201, SERD Building

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Cities by Women: Embedding Climate Change Resilience in Himalayan Cities

The research focuses on gender mainstreaming in the nexus of climate change, land use, and informal livelihoods in Himalayan cities. Expected activities include:
1) survey and mapping to examine how women in informal settlements use the urban spaces for their livelihoods and what the impacts of climate change on their daily activities are;
2) stakeholder workshop and networking to address and inform the urban policy about women’s role in building climate change resilience in Himalayan cities.

Keywords Gender, Climate change, Informal livelihood, Urban space, Urban planning

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What is Essential is Invisible’: Empowerment and Security in Economic Projects for Low-Income Women in Four Mekong Countries (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam)

This research project, using both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, focused on women’s economic empowerment and social protection projects in four Mekong countries: Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam. It involved an exploration of the gaps between the level of policy makers and intended beneficiaries in terms of their conceptions of the ideas of empowerment and security and their perceptions of what is happening on the ‘ground’. In addition, the research examined under what conditions empowerment (as locally defined) and an increase in a sense of security (again, as locally defined) came as a result of economic empowerment and social protection projects, and under what conditions there was no such apparent benefit – or even negative effects – in spite of the well-meaning intentions of the projects. One key finding is that empowerment is not a single recipe, it needs to be contextualized, and that for a large number of low income women in the four countries, empowerment was a social or relational process, an aspect of empowerment often neglected by donors and development practitioners.

Keywords Economic Empowerment, Income, Gender, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Vietnam

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Understanding Barriers and Working Pathways to Women’s Political Participation In Myanmar

The aim of the project is to assess the extent and forms of women’s participation in the political sphere in Myanmar, and explore barriers and enabling factors. We define participation beyond just actions that influence or support governments to taking part in collective decision-making in a broad sense. Previous research has demonstrated low levels of women’s representation in national, subnational, and community governance, and explored the social and cultural norms that bar women from taking leadership roles.1 This research will extend these insights to analyze the pathways to participation across multiple levels of governance: (1) National parliament, political parties, and social movements; (2) State/Division parliaments, government offices; and (3) District, township, and village groups. Using the concept of pathways will allow us to utilize and study women’s personal path to political power, to understand what can undermine at any point upward mobility in the political system and what can facilitate or provide entry points or further engagement at different moments in a woman’s life.

Keywords Gender, Political Participation, Equality, Myanmar

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